The Children are the invisible guardians of the Landfill treasures. ~GreenFire

It isn’t the landfill waste driving 20% of all global pollution, its your waste.

Thank God men cannot fly, and lay waste the sky as well as the earth.  ~Henry David Thoreau

There is a sufficiency in the world for man’s need but not for man’s greed.  ~Mohandas K. Gandhi

Facts and Statstics From:

http://www.globalissues.org/article/26/poverty-facts-and-stats

At least 200 people were killed in a giant landslide at Ethiopia’s largest rubbish dump with entire families including children buried alive in the tragedy. The landfill is the country’s largest and home to perhaps thousands of people who collected recyclables that were trucked in from neighbourhoods around the city of about 4 million people.

For $30 billion, we could end world hunger completely. Not to food-shame anyone, but every year, Americans throw away more than five times that much ($165 billion) in unwanted snacks and meals.

Almost half the world — over three billion people — live on less than $2.50 a day.

According to UNICEF, 22,000 children die each day due to poverty. And they die quietly in some of the poorest villages on earth, far removed from the scrutiny and the conscience of the world. Being meek and weak in life makes these dying multitudes even more invisible in death

Less than one per cent of what the world spent every year on weapons was needed to put every child into school by the year 2000 and yet it didn’t happen.

In developing countries some 2.5 billion people are forced to rely on biomass—fuelwood, charcoal and animal dung—to meet their energy needs for cooking. In sub-Saharan Africa, over 80 percent of the population depends on traditional biomass for cooking, as do over half of the populations of India and China.

Less than one per cent of what the world spent every year on weapons was needed to put every child into school by the year 2000 and yet it didn’t happen.

Source Water problems affect half of humanity:

  • Some 1.1 billion people in developing countries have inadequate access to water, and 2.6 billion lack basic sanitation.
  • Almost two in three people lacking access to clean water survive on less than $2 a day, with one in three living on less than $1 a day.
  • More than 660 million people without sanitation live on less than $2 a day, and more than 385 million on less than $1 a day.
  • Access to piped water into the household averages about 85% for the wealthiest 20% of the population, compared with 25% for the poorest 20%.
  • 1.8 billion people who have access to a water source within 1 kilometre, but not in their house or yard, consume around 20 litres per day. In the United Kingdom the average person uses more than 50 litres of water a day flushing toilets (where average daily water usage is about 150 liters a day. The highest average water use in the world is in the US, at 600 liters day.)
  • Some 1.8 million child deaths each year as a result of diarrhoea
  • The loss of 443 million school days each year from water-related illness.
  • Close to half of all people in developing countries suffering at any given time from a health problem caused by water and sanitation deficits.
  • Millions of women spending several hours a day collecting water.
  • To these human costs can be added the massive economic waste associated with the water and sanitation deficit.… The costs associated with health spending, productivity losses and labour diversions … are greatest in some of the poorest countries. Sub-Saharan Africa loses about 5% of GDP, or some $28.4 billion annually, a figure that exceeds total aid flows and debt relief to the region in 2003.

Approximately 790 million people in the developing world are still chronically undernourished, almost two-thirds of whom reside in Asia and the Pacific.

A mere 12 percent of the world’s population uses 85 percent of its water, and these 12 percent do not live in the Third World.

Some more numbers on the state of the world’s children

From UNICEF, the world’s premier children’s organization, part of the United Nations:

  • 2.5 billion people lack access to improved sanitation
  • 1 billion children are deprived of one or more services essential to survival and development
  • 148 million under 5s in developing regions are underweight for their age
  • 101 million children are not attending primary school, with more girls than boys missing out
  • 22 million infants are not protected from diseases by routine immunization
  • 7.6 million children worldwide died before their 5th birthday in 2010
  • 4 million newborns worldwide are dying in the first month of life
  • 2 million children under 15 are living with HIV
  • 500,000 women die each year from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth

Source: State of the World’s Children, 2010 , UNICEF, p.18-19. See also ChildInfo. The continuation of this suffering and loss of life contravenes the natural human instinct to help in times of disaster. Imagine the horror of the world if a major earthquake were to occur and people stood by and watched without assisting the survivors! Yet every day, the equivalent of a major earthquake killing over 30,000 young children occurs to a disturbingly muted response. They die quietly in some of the poorest villages on earth, far removed from the scrutiny and the conscience of the world. Being meek and weak in life makes these dying multitudes even more invisible in death.

A spotty scorecard, UNICEF, Progress of Nations 2000

It may be harsh to say the mainstream media is one of the many causes of poverty, as such, but the point here is that their influence is enormous. Silence, as well as noise, can both have an effect.

Since most child deaths occur in the most deprived communities, further reductions in child mortality depend on investments in those communities, according to the study. Universal primary education cannot be achieved without extending schooling to those currently excluded, the poorest and the most marginalized children.